How to improve patient satisfaction

How to improve patient satisfaction

Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) 2014 annual conference attendees were fortunate to get some tips for improving patient satisfaction from Joan Hablutzel, senior industry analyst with the MGMA—because doing so is essential to the success of a medical practice in an increasingly competitive health-care marketplace.

Obtaining patient engagement

Obtaining patient engagement

For the first time ever, achieving meaningful use depends on patient behavior: Meaningful use Stage 2 requires at least 5 percent of a health-care provider’s patients to be engaged in their own care— either through an electronic medical record (EMR) or an online portal.

Recent hacker attack highlights need for security

Recent hacker attack highlights need for security

Multiple cyber attacks, possibly by hacker group Anonymous, plagued the Boston Children’s Hospital in April – highlighting the need for data security in all health-care environments.

The attacks may have been a response to the case of 15-year-old patient Justina Pelletier, who the hospital reported to the state as being the victim of medical neglect, ultimately resulting in the state assuming custody.

Focus on your core business by outsourcing your IT

HealthcareIT_Apr02_AChief Information Officer (CIO) Denis Tanguay’s workload has quadrupled over the past few years, and he has been struggling to stay on top ensuring that systems are secure and available when his employees need it. How did he overcome these struggles? He found a solution in outsourcing.

Meaningful use has been good business – but not perfect

HealthcareIT_Jan02_AIn the early 2000s – even into the current decade – health care had some catching up to do when it came to technology. Much of the industry was paper-based and when technology was used, it was often in separate areas, creating silos of information that couldn’t communicate.

Medical device connectivity market to boom

HealthcareGeneral_Dec03_AThe global market for medical device connectivity is projected to top USD$33 billion by 2019, up significantly from USD$3.5 billion in 2013 – and that could have major implications for health-care providers.

An increase in medical conditions such as high blood pressure, asthma and diabetes – which require continuous monitoring – are driving growth in the integration of medical devices.